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Intimate partner violence is closely connected to women’s economic security, including their income, employment, and housing. Research has shown that intimate partner violence both directly and indirectly impacts survivors’ ability to work and maintain employment. This can be compounded by other factors, including gender, race, and age. Racialized women face systemic barriers to economic equality and are more likely to be in precarious and low-income employment than non-racialized women.

This research report draws on qualitative data gathered through surveys and interviews with racialized survivors. The report explores the experiences of racialized survivors in accessing and maintaining employment. It discusses the impact that trauma from racism and intimate partner violence has on women’s employment and what is needed to better support racialized survivors to access and maintain meaningful employment.

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Economic abuse can be any form of financial control, abuse, mistreatment, and neglect. Senior immigrant women can have unique experiences of economic abuse because of intersecting identities of gender, age and immigration experience. Each of these have been known to impact experiences of gender-based violence and help seeking.

This leaflet provides information for senior immigrant women on identifying and seeking help for economic abuse. The leaflet is available in Amharic, Arabic, English, Farsi, Korean, Punjabi, Simplified Chinese, Spanish, Tagalog, Traditional Chinese and Urdu.

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Senior immigrant women occupy intersecting identities of gender, age and immigration. Each of these have been known to impact experiences of gender-based violence and help seeking. Furthermore, these intersections can create specific risk factors related to economic abuse.

This report examines the dynamics and experiences of economic abuse among senior immigrant women. The first part of this report explores the existing literature on economic abuse among senior immigrant women. The second part of this report contains findings from community-based research undertaken with service providers and senior immigrant women with lived experience of economic abuse.

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The project will bring together key stakeholders, including senior women and community agencies, to raise awareness of gender-based violence, strengthen referral pathways and build the capacity of community agencies to identify and respond to violence against senior women.

Over the past 10 years, 1 in 5 women killed by gender-based violence in Canada were over 65 years old, representing a large victim age group. In addition to being at high risk of violence, senior women face unique risk factors and barriers to accessing services and supports. For example, family violence may be more difficult to identify among senior women because of dependencies on others or social isolation.

The project will create resources and deliver capacity building on violence against senior women. The project will also support senior women to raise awareness of gender-based violence, including family and intimate partner violence in their communities.

Seeking Volunteer Project Advisors

WomanACT is seeking Volunteer Project Advisors to support the AGES project. Project Advisors will support in an advisory capacity on the project as well as have an opportunity to plan and host training or community events on gender-based violence and senior women in the community. We are seeking women 55 years and older who have experienced intimate partner and/or family violence.

Engagement will take place between June 2022 and February 2023. Honorarium will be provided to volunteers.

Download the Project Advisor posting here.

For more information, or to express interest, please email Premila Chellapermal at pchellapermal@womanact.ca.

Measures put in place to mitigate COVID-19, such as stay at home orders, have put families experiencing intimate partner violence at greater risk. In particular, young women and women with children have been identified at greater risk for increased violence, housing instability, and decreased service provision.

The project will investigate patterns of violence and housing instability, and examine changes to experiences and services during the pandemic. The project will undertake a realist informed review of literature and conduct primary research. The project will also work closely with survivors to create digital narratives. Using the knowledge created, the project will build collaboration with policy makers, service providers and other knowledge users.

The Successful Tenancies project is working to improve women’s access to, and experience in, the private rental housing market in Toronto.

Gender-based violence is a common cause of homelessness among women and gender-diverse people in Toronto. A lack of access to safe and affordable housing is a key barrier to women and gender-diverse people’s safety. It can prevent them from leaving violent situations or lead them into precarious housing situations. Women face a range of barriers to accessing housing in the private rental market, including affordability and discrimination.

The project will undertake research into survivors’ experiences in navigating the private rental market in Toronto. Using this knowledge, the project will build the capacity of landlords and housing providers to increase access to, and better meet the needs of, survivors of gender-based violence. The project will also use the knowledge created to build partnerships across community and housing sectors.

The right to housing is more than just a roof over one’s head. It is the right to safe, affordable and permanent housing. Survivors living in violent situations are experiencing a violation to their right to housing. Survivors are also at a high risk of homelessness and face a range of barriers to obtaining housing.

This infographic highlights the connections between right to housing, violence against women and homelessness.

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Violations of the right to housing are largely gendered, with women and gender-diverse people more likely to experience inadequate housing and homelessness. The right to housing is defined as all individuals having the right to safe and adequate housing. As such, women living in violent homes are also experiencing a direct violation of their right to housing.

This issue brief explores the connections between the right to housing and violence against women. The brief looks at the connections between homelessness and violence and the key barriers to survivors obtaining safe, adequate and permanent housing.

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Intimate partner violence is directly connected to women’s economic security, including survivors’ employment and career progression. Studies show that intimate partner violence is associated with job instability and job loss. Furthermore, the barriers to employment for some survivors is compounded by structural discrimination.

This literature review explores existing research on the relationship between employment and intimate partner violence, with a focus on the experience of racialized survivors. It examines the impact of intimate partner violence on employment stability, the barriers faced by survivors in the workplace and the impact of structural racism on racialized survivors’ employment. Lastly, the review looks at promising practices for supporting survivors to access and sustain employment.

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The rise of the #MeToo movement has shifted dramatically society’s awareness of gender and sexual harassment, but global rates of gender and sexual harassment remain high. While there are many contributing factors, time and time again male-dominated workplaces are found to have higher rates of workplace gender and sexual harassment than spaces that have greater gender parity. This is particularly important for STEM fields, where women are a low percentage of the workforce.

This literature review explores the knowledge available on the subject of preventing and responding to gender and sexual harassment in the workplace, with a focus on STEM workplaces. It explores strategies for workplace prevention, training and response systems in addition to examples of best practices.

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